Oct 3
2016

Tor.com on The Family Plot

The Family Plot by Cherie Priest

“Priest has a striking prose style—­she’s immensely readable—­and a chilling ability to write really unnerving scenes…The house itself is an incredible character. Place matters, here: matters deeply. One of the most notable things about The Family Plot, as a southern Gothic haunted house horror novel, is the sense of ever-increasing claustrophobia. It’s about interiors, both literal and metaphorical: the interior of the house, and the inside of a person’s mind and/or emotions. The inside of the home turned strange and threatening: the inside of the self exposed and forced into the light.” — Tor.com

Sep 29
2016

RT Book Reviews on The Family Plot

The Family Plot by Cherie Priest

“Priest continues to cement her reputation as a master of modern gothic with a haunted house tale that’s a slow burn with an utterly addictive finale. Though it feels like more could be done with the ghosts of the Withrow house, the living characters do more than their fair share of lifting with interactions that are charming and funny. That said, fans and new readers should walk away satisfied and just a little bit worried when in the house alone.” — RT Book Reviews, 4 stars

Sep 15
2016

Booklist starred review for The Family Plot

The Family Plot by Cherie Priest

“In Priest’s gothic haunted-house story, workers at failing architectural salvage company are given a once-in-a-lifetime chance to reverse their fortunes, if they can survive the ghosts plaguing the property. Dahlia Dutton, the daughter of Music City Salvage’s owner, loves old houses. She’s still sore over losing her own beautifully restored home in her divorce. Once Dahlia arrives at the grand, well-preserved Withrow estate in the Tennessee mountains, she wishes she could save it; instead, she and her crew­her estranged cousin Bobby; his lovable son, Gabe; and salvage rookie Brad­have mere days to rescue the valuables before demolition. To save money, they sleep on-site, when the mansion’s romantic charm turns menacing. Strange occurrences and spectral sightings increase as the crew dismantles the house, exposing the Withrow family’s secrets. Priest spices up a standard haunting with an irresistible premise focused on the “hidden treasure” aspect of salvage work. Careful character building accentuates the novel’s slow build, so by the time the salvagers are in real danger, they feel like real people, too. Despite lulls in pacing, the final scenes are terrifying. Highly recommended for fans of contemporary ghost stories.” — Booklist, Starred Review

Jul 20
2016

Publishers Weekly starred review for The Family Plot

The Family Plot by Cherie Priest

“When Dahlia Dutton’s father sends her and a small crew to salvage a house near Lookout Mountain, Tenn., she finds that what you don’t know can hurt you in Priest’s spectacular modern haunted-house story. Dahlia is no stranger to ghosts, whether she’s being emotionally haunted by a failed marriage or by the metaphorical spirits that linger in old buildings. The concept of home salvage disturbing ghosts is brilliant, and while common elements of haunted house stories are certainly present (a mysterious owner with family secrets, locked rooms, unnatural storms, etc.), Priest (Boneshaker) handles them with tremendous skill, putting the pieces together to keep the reader guessing and more than a little scared. The characters are given a compelling reason to stay (the family business will fail if this job falls through) and their interpersonal dynamics humanize them, making them more than just cannon fodder as the hauntings increase in severity. Priest has written an excellent modern house story from start to finish.” — Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

May 4
2016

AudioFile on Princess X

I Am Princess X by Cherie Priest

“Priest’s compelling audiobook stars high-schooler May, computer whiz Trick, and the city of Seattle, which figures prominently in their adventures. May’s best friend died in a car accident when they were younger. Only now, May’s discovering hints that Libby may not be gone after all. Narrator Mary Robinette Kowal has an interesting voice (listeners may find themselves trying to place her regionalisms), and it sounds just different enough to add even more auditory interest. The print book features graphic novel sections, which the audio production effectively evokes with music and sound effects, while Kowal uses a booming movie trailer voice to clearly distinguish them from the rest of the narrative. Listeners will be caught up in the suspenseful (if occasionally far-fetched) action.” — AudioFile

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