Apr 9
2015

San Francisco Book Review on Jacaranda by Cherie Priest

Jacaranda by Cherie Priest

“Something monstrous is lurking the halls of the Jacaranda Hotel. Guests check in but don’t check out, and whoever is committing these horrific murders is only growing more brazen. As a major hurricane approaches, a motley assortment of guests hunker down inside the Jacaranda, hoping to outlast both the storm and the murders. Can the curious team of a nun, a gun-toting priest, and a Texas Ranger save their fellow guests from threats both inside and out?

While other novels in Priest’s Clockwork Century series have dabbled in supernatural elements, Jacaranda is the first to go full bore and embrace the supernatural. It leaves behind much of the steampunk and pseudoscientific trappings that characterize the series, offering a cursed hotel and perils less tangible than sap-poisoned rotters and Civil War profiteers.

But a supernatural mystery doesn’t work unless we care about who might die, so Priest enlists Horatio Korman (from Dreadnought and Ganymede) and teams him with two engaging new protagonists who have been touched by the supernatural in the past, nun Eileen Callahan and former priest Juan Miguel Quintero Rios.

A welcome new wrinkle in an established series, Jacaranda shows there’s plenty of life left in the Clockwork Century universe. (4 of 5 stars)” — San Francisco Book Review

Mar 31
2015

Publishers Weekly starred review for I Am Princess X by Cherie Priest

I Am Princess X by Cherie Priest

“Back in fifth grade, best friends May and Libby created Princess X, a katana-wielding heroine who wears Converse sneakers with her ball gown. Ever since Libby and her mother died in a freak accident, May’s life has been as gray as her Seattle home ­until the 16-year-old spots a Princess X sticker in a store window, leading her to a Princess X webcomic that suggests that Libby might still be alive. With the help of Trick, a hacker-for-hire, May follows the trail that Princess X’s near-mythic narrative leaves for her, which incorporates Seattle landmarks like the Fremont Troll and characters like the dangerous Needle Man and the mysterious, helpful Jackdaw. Illustrations from the Princess X comic­ skillfully rendered by Ciesemier and printed in purple­ add greatly to this techno-thriller’s tension. Fresh and contemporary, this hybrid novel/comic packs a lot of plot in a relatively short book, but its strongest suit may be Priest’s keen understanding of the chasmic gap between the way teens and adults engage in the landscape of the Internet.” — Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

Mar 16
2015

Booklist starred review for I Am Princess X by Cherie Priest

I Am Princess X by Cherie Priest

“May and Libby came up with Princess X, a katana-wielding cartoon girl with a crown and red Chucks, on the day they met in fifth grade, and for the next several years of their friendship, they wrote enough stories about her to fill a closet. But then Libby and her mother die in a car accident, and May tries to move on with her life, but she can’t shake the feeling that not everything adds up about Libby’s death. Three years later, May notices a faded vinyl sticker that is unmistakably Princess X. Then she discovers a webcomic about her, which includes characters that look alarmingly like Libby and May, and clues that only May can decipher. With the help of her tech-savvy neighbor, Trick, May looks all over (and under) Seattle to uncover the truth about her best friend. Interspersed with Ciesemier’s webcomic-style illustrations, Priest’s YA debut is an engrossing cyberthriller packed with a puzzling mystery, crackerjack detective work, and an eerie, atmospheric sense of place. The unembellished style is a perfect match for the noir-lite tone, and May and Trick, whose banter crackles with energy, rival any team of gumshoes out there. Teens who roll their eyes at adults out of touch with Internet culture will eat this up.” — Booklist, Starred Review

Jan 23
2015

RT Book Reviews on Jacaranda by Cherie Priest

Jacaranda by Cherie Priest

Priest continues to be an effective crafter of dread and tension, and
while Jacaranda is explicitly a novella, there are a few areas where
the reader might wish for more. Despite being set in her Clockwork
Century universe, aside from a few background touches, this could
easily take place in any version of the Old West, and the book seems
to be building to something bigger than it ultimately winds up being.
The characters here are vivid and interesting enough that hopefully
this particular adventure isn’t the last of we hear of them, or of the
survivors at least.

Just off the coast of Texas, on the island of Galveston, there’s a
hotel named the Jacaranda. It would be the nicest resort in the area,
if not for the fact that everyone who comes there is dying one by one.
Now, a priest with a bloody past, a nun with a bloody secret and an
old Texas Ranger who specializes in the odd and uncanny have all come
to the Jacaranda to put whatever hungers there to rest — or die
trying. — RT Book Reviews, 4 stars

Jan 16
2015

Maplecroft nominated for the Phillip K. Dick Award!

priest-maplecroftCongratulations to Cherie Priest on Maplecroft being nominated for the 2014 Phillip K. Dick Award!

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