Feb 4
2020

2019 Locus Recommended Reading List

The 2019 Locus Recommended Reading List includes Elizabeth Bear, Nicky Drayden, Yoon Ha Lee, and Tamsyn Muir!

NOVELS – SCIENCE FICTION

Ancestral Night, Elizabeth Bear (Saga; Gollancz)
Escaping Exodus, Nicky Drayden (Harper Voyager US)

NOVELS – FANTASY

The Red-Stained Wings, Elizabeth Bear (Tor)

YOUNG ADULT NOVELS

Dragon Pearl, Yoon Ha Lee (Disney Hyperion)

FIRST NOVELS

Gideon the Ninth, Tamsyn Muir (Tor.com Publishing)

COLLECTIONS

Hexarchate Stories, Yoon Ha Lee (Solaris US & UK)

NOVELLAS

“A Time to Reap“, Elizabeth Bear (Uncanny 12/19)
“Glass Cannon”, Yoon Ha Lee (Hexarchate Stories)

NOVELETTES

“Erase, Erase, Erase”, Elizabeth Bear (F&SF 9-10/19)

SHORT STORIES

“Lest We Forget“, Elizabeth Bear (Uncanny 5-6/19)

Jan 23
2020

Kirkus on The Best of Elizabeth Bear

The Best of Elizabeth Bear by Elizabeth Bear

“A collection with 27 excellent stories showcasing the talent of one of the genre’s most versatile writers. ‘Covenant,’ for example, is a suspenseful story about a serial killer who becomes a victim. The science fiction twist is that he undergoes a voluntary procedure called ‘rightminding,’ which rewires his brain to reduce his psychopathic tendencies. He also becomes a woman in the process—and thus the target of another psychopath. Because the memories of her time as a serial killer remain, she can speculate on what her male abductor might do next, making for a tense story. ‘In the House of Aryaman, a Lonely Signal Burns’ reads like a police procedural locked-room murder mystery in which the victim’s corpse appears to have been turned inside out. But other components in the story elevate it above standard fare, such as the investigator’s tense relationship with her VR-addicted mother, an engineered cat who might be a witness to the crime, a company developing fourth-dimension technology, and the strange behavior of a star in the Andromeda system. Asimovian robots—albeit racier ones than any Asimov ever created—are featured in ‘Dolly,’ a mystery in which a sex robot has been used to kill her owner. Is she the murder weapon or the murderer? Ethical issues are raised in this engaging story, one of the many to be found in this must-have collection” — Kirkus

Dec 16
2019

NYPL 2019 Best Books for Adults includes Bear and Muir

Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir and Ancestral Night by Elizabeth Bear are on the New York Public Library’s 2019 Best of list!

Dec 3
2019

Booklist on The Best of Elizabeth Bear

The Best of Elizabeth Bear by Elizabeth Bear

“Longtime genre fiction readers will know exactly what they’re getting in this omnibus. Bear covers a lot of ground, from strange, magical westerns to near-future science fiction to the fantastic world of the Steles of the Sky trilogy—all with her characteristic style and attention to detail. The collection begins with the fascinating and haunting tale of a serial killer in “Covenant” and ends with the recent “Erase, Erase, Erase,” a haunting look at responsibility, identity, and memory. Notable in between are a tale of a literal rock god (“Hobnoblin Blues”), a visit with Doc Holliday (“Faster Gun”), even a murder mystery with unexpected and far-reaching consequences (“Dolly”). Even the shortest and lightest of these stories are ambitious in their scope, and the volume is sizable enough to offer something for fans of every aspect of Bear’s storytelling. The breadth makes it an excellent starting point for readers new to Bear, as well, and in this book will keep all readers occupied for quite some time.” — Booklist

Nov 11
2019

Publishers Weekly on The Best of Elizabeth Bear

The Best of Elizabeth Bear by Elizabeth Bear

“The 27 intimate, thought-provoking stories of this doorstopper collection span over a decade of Hugo Award–winner Bear’s illustrious career. Though many of these offer glimpses into vast, intricate worlds, all are grounded in deep human feeling and small, interpersonal dramas, as with “Two Dreams on Trains,” which is set in a complex, futuristic vision of New Orleans and focuses on the clash between a mother’s hopes for her son and the boy’s goals for himself. In the emotional standout “Tideline,” a sentient war machine named Chalcedony, who was not programmed to feel emotion, uses her last reserves of energy to scour a beach for sea glass to turn into mourning jewelry in honor of her fallen human platoon. Bear’s protagonists range from machines (the living spaceships of “Boojum”) to the human (the tired homicide cop in “Dolly”) to the monstrous (the discontented vampire of “Needles”), but she crafts them all with huge helpings of empathy and heart. This excellent collection offers readers the chance to immerse themselves in Bear’s singular imagination.” — Publishers Weekly

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