Dec 6
2019

Dragon Pearl is one of Kirkus’s best of 2019!

Dragon Pearl by Yoon Ha Lee makes Kirkus’s list of the Best Middle-Grade Fantasy & Science Fiction of 2019!

Dec 3
2019

Booklist on The Best of Elizabeth Bear

The Best of Elizabeth Bear by Elizabeth Bear

“Longtime genre fiction readers will know exactly what they’re getting in this omnibus. Bear covers a lot of ground, from strange, magical westerns to near-future science fiction to the fantastic world of the Steles of the Sky trilogy—all with her characteristic style and attention to detail. The collection begins with the fascinating and haunting tale of a serial killer in “Covenant” and ends with the recent “Erase, Erase, Erase,” a haunting look at responsibility, identity, and memory. Notable in between are a tale of a literal rock god (“Hobnoblin Blues”), a visit with Doc Holliday (“Faster Gun”), even a murder mystery with unexpected and far-reaching consequences (“Dolly”). Even the shortest and lightest of these stories are ambitious in their scope, and the volume is sizable enough to offer something for fans of every aspect of Bear’s storytelling. The breadth makes it an excellent starting point for readers new to Bear, as well, and in this book will keep all readers occupied for quite some time.” — Booklist

Nov 29
2019

Booklist starred review for Escaping Exodus

Escaping Exodus by Nicky Drayden

“Drayden’s latest (after Temper, 2018) is a sweeping, smart, stunning story that dazzles brighter than a star system. Seske Kaleigh is the young heir to the command of a starship that is comprised of the insides of a whale-like space beast. Adalla is her best friend and lover of a lower caste. The young girls are among the descendants of Africa, who resettled among the stars and rely on whale-like space beasts to keep them alive. They carve out cities within the interior body cavern of the beasts and make a home there until the beast begins to die. Then, they move on, catching and carving up the next beast in order to ensure their continued survival. When their clan’s newest excavated beast is assailed with violent tremors, the girls embark on a journey to unearth the cause and save their people’s new home. The premise of Escaping Exodus is a biology lover’s dream, with an animal’s bones being used for building material and its circulatory system for mass transit. Yet, Drayden excels in writing the tech in a way that will reach out and ensnares every reader—not just biology geeks. She has created a whimsical, complex, rich setting whose world is the literal anatomy of a beast. Interwoven with the body horror, environmentalism, and classism that Drayden artfully explores is a love story between two Black girls from different castes, making Escaping Exodus a true gem to be treasured.” — Booklist, Starred Review

Nov 26
2019

Gideon the Ninth is one of Library Journal’s best of 2019!

Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir is on Library Journal’s Best SF/Fantasy 2019 list!

Nov 18
2019

Locus on Gideon the Ninth

Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

“One of the most irreverent characters I’ve encountered in a long time, Gideon Nav wants only to escape the House of the Ninth, a dark place populated by the dead and the few living necromancers that control them. Gideon, no necromancer but an enthusiastic swordswoman, keeps trying to escape and join the military Cohort, but her plans are continually foiled. Then she’s offered something new—if she accompanies the Lady of the Ninth House, the much-loathed necromancer Harrowhark, on a mission. The Emperor, the King Undying, has called for each house to send their first (Harrowhark) and their cavalier to be tested as potential Lyctors. The problem is the Ninth’s cavalier is unwilling, so Harrowhark drafts Gideon, and the two are off to another world where they end up in an incomprehensible contest against the other eight houses in a decaying, mazelike complex. Foul-mouthed Gideon is a joy to watch as she attempts to pass as a cavalier, falls for one of the competition, and basically spends a hell of a lot of time trying to figure out what’s going on – gradually learning to work with Harrowhark, and maybe even coming to appreciate her. Other characters aren’t always as well delineated, which adds to the confusion at times. This universe is fascinating and the story intense; much remains frustratingly obscure, but intriguingly so. I was seriously starting to question how an empire this decayed could possibly survive, but somehow it all manages to be truly compelling fun. Muir’s impressive first novel offers a heady and macabre mix of science, necromancy, constant danger, and a healthy dollop of Gormenghast-like weirdness like no other.” — Locus

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