Jul 9
2008

Theodore Sturgeon Award

Congratulations to Elizabeth Bear on winning a Theodore Sturgeon Award, honoring the best short fiction published in the US, for her short story “Tideline” (originally published in Asimov’s, June 2007).

Jun 23
2008

review of Elizabeth Bear’s Hell and Earth by Publishers Weekly

“Completing the story of Will Shakespeare and Kit Marley (Christopher Marlowe) begun in 2008’s Ink and Steel, Campbell-winner Bear proves again that she can fill a stage as well as any Elizabethan playwright, entwining tragedies of betrayal and blood-soaked revenge with country pastoral and domestic comedy. Will, released from Hell, returns to a mortal court where black magic threatens Queen Elizabeth, and his poetry becomes her bulwark. Kit, bound to a trapped angel, likewise works to discover who in Faerie caused the murder of Will’s son, Hamnet. Navigating the tangled intrigues of backstabbing courtiers and malicious magicians, the poets strive to thwart a plot to reshape the world through the power of story. Released on the heels of Ink and Steel, this complex and character-driven tale is best read with the other Promethean Age novels close at hand, not least because it lacks the all-important dramatis personae.”

Novels of the Promethean Age:
Blood and Iron (June 2006)
Whiskey and Water (July 2007)
Ink and Steel (July 2008)
Hell and Earth (August 2008)

Jun 17
2008

review of Elizabeth Bear’s Ink and Steel from Library Journal

“Elizabeth I rules England in the “iron world” of humanity; the other realm, of Faerie, claims Queen Mab as monarch. Both worlds exist in symbiosis, but each world is threatened by treachery from within. When Elizabeth’s personal spy, poet and playwright Christopher Marlowe, is murdered, his ability to weave sustaining magics into his plays is lost. His replacement, rival William Shakespeare, possesses talent but lacks magic. In order to save England, Faerie intervenes, raising Marlowe as Mab’s servant — and Shakespeare’s teacher. The latest installment in Bear’s historical fantasy series featuring an Earth infused with magic as well as machinery both explores the fertile literary movements of the Elizabethan era and reveals the origins of the Promethean age. The author’s mastery of period detail and her ability to interweave literature and politics while bringing to life some of history’s most beloved and problematic characters make this a welcome addition to any library.

Novels of the Promethean Age:
Blood and Iron (June 2006)
Whiskey and Water (July 2007)
Ink and Steel (July 2008)
Hell and Earth (August 2008)

Jun 11
2008

Theodore Sturgeon and John W. Campbell Memorial Award Finalists announced

Congratulations to Elizabeth Bear for her story “Tideline” (Asimov’s, June 2007) – a finalist for the Sturgeon, for best science fiction story of the year.

Congratulations to Jay Lake for his book, Mainspring – a finalist for the John W. Campbell Memorial, for best science fiction novel of the year (this is not the same as the Campbell-not-a-Hugo award at Worldcon).

You are both keeping some might fine company!

May 19
2008

Elizabeth Bear’s new Promethean novel garners starred review in PW

Ink and Steel: A Novel of the Promethean Age
Elizabeth Bear. Roc, $14 paper (448p) ISBN 978-0-451-46209-1

Campbell-winner Bear reveals the secret war between fae and the Elizabethan court in this dramatic prequel to Blood and Iron and Whiskey and Water. Framed with the intrigues of queens and courtiers, the story focuses on the mutual respect and growing love of Kit Marley (aka Christopher Marlowe) and Will Shakespeare. As Morgan le Fey rescues Kit from assassins, various factions recruit Will to bolster their political machinations with the magic of poetry. Kit pulls Will into Faerie and both are forced to face their own deepest desires and fears, which cannot be resolved until they deal with a power even higher than mortal Queen Elizabeth or fae Queen Mab. Copious quotes and intelligent speculation about their lives and works mark this sensitive and sensual look at the two supreme playwrights of the English Renaissance. The story’s second half, Hell and Earth, is due out in August. (July) — Publishers Weekly, starred review

« Previous EntriesNext Entries »