May 9
2013

Locus Award nominations for 2013 are in!

Congratulations to clients in the following categories…

Fantasy Novel:
Glamour in Glass, Mary Robinette Kowal (Tor)

First Novel:
Throne of the Crescent Moon, Saladin Ahmed (DAW; Gollancz ’13)

Novella:
In the House of Aryaman, a Lonely Signal Burns”, Elizabeth Bear (Asimov’s 1/12)
The Stars Do Not Lie”, Jay Lake (Asimov’s 10-11/12)

Novelette:
Faster Gun”, Elizabeth Bear (Tor.com 8/12)
The Lady Astronaut of Mars”, Mary Robinette Kowal (Rip-Off!)

Short Story:
The Deeps of the Sky”, Elizabeth Bear (Edge of Infinity)

Collection:
Shoggoths in Bloom, Elizabeth Bear (Prime)

Full list of nominations here.

Apr 2
2013

Congratulations to the 2013 Hugo Award nominees!

Over the Easter weekend, the 2013 ballot for the Hugo Awards was announced. The award ceremony will be hosted by LoneStarCon 3.

* Congratulations to Saladin Ahmed for Throne of the Crescent Moon in the novel category!

* Congratulations to Jay Lake for “The Stars Do Not Lie” (Asimov’s, Oct-Nov 2012) in the novella category!

* Congratulations to Mary Robinette Kowal as part of the Writing Excuses team for Writing Excuses Season Seven in the Best Related Work category!

* Congratulations to Jason Heller as part of the editorial team for Clarkesworld in the Best Semiprozine category!

More details here. Congratulations to all the finalists.

Dec 17
2012

PW review of Kalimpura

Kalimpura by Jay Lake

In this introspective sequel to Green and Endurance, Lake continues the tale of Green, a former courtesan and assassin now attempting to settle down following the birth of her twins. Unfinished business and old enemies take Green and her allies back to the city of Kalimpura, where she must keep a low profile while trying to find two kidnapped girls. However, discretion is difficult with multiple gods taking interest in her doings and several factions out for her blood. There’s something both uplifting and melancholy in this fantasy adventure’s tone, which 16-year-old Green narrates with a world-weary old soul’s experience, emotional weight hanging from every page. Thoughtful fantasy readers will appreciate Green’s newfound perspective and the lush details derived from a mixture of Eastern cultures, as well as the sheer audacity of a killer bisexual nonwhite teen mom protagonist. The pace drags occasionally, but it’s worth it in the long run. –Publishers Weekly

Oct 25
2011

Starred PW review for new Jay Lake fantasy

Endurance by Jay Lake

Assassin and ex-courtesan Green has saved a city and birthed a god (in 2009’s Green). Now she wants to move on—but she’s hunted by enemies from her past, the city council is mired in a power struggle and can’t provide much aid, and something is stalking goddesses, including the one Green serves. Lake deftly weaves complicated, stubborn characters into a plot that reaches the grandest and most personal scales without ever straining credulity. Green’s basically solitary nature, expressed in extensive internal monologue, is balanced by her feelings of tenderness, responsibility, and exasperation toward her fellow humans, the catlike Pardines, and the gods. Her pragmatic acceptance of killing is likewise mitigated by her refusal to trivialize death and her emotional reactions to pregnancy’s effects on her body, self-control, and expectations. This complex, lonesome, haunting novel will appeal to fans of Valente, Monette, and Miéville. –Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

Aug 17
2010

new Jay Lake collection reviewed by Booklist

The Sky That Wraps by Jay Lake

Lake writes extraordinary short stories, with note-perfect world building as strong as that in his novels. This collection, which focuses on more recent work, opens with “The Sky That Wraps the World Around, Past the Blue and into the Black,” in which the narrator paints ancient shards end-of-the-universe blue. “Achilles, Sulking in His Buick” is a delightful street-racing interpretation of the Trojan War’s key events. There are two new stories as well: “Coming for Green,” which tells of an agent of the Lily Goddess sent to retrieve Green, and “To This Their Late Escape,” which is part of Lake’s satisfying take on space opera. There are also a number of stories set in what Lake calls the Portland wizards arc, including the first one, “The Number of the Bus,” which focuses on a wizard whose power comes from a city bus. Lake covers quite a bit of ground, from the mythic to the futuristic, and does it all with a strong take on the human element and genuinely fantastic tales. –Booklist

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