May 9
2013

Locus Award nominations for 2013 are in!

Congratulations to clients in the following categories…

Fantasy Novel:
Glamour in Glass, Mary Robinette Kowal (Tor)

First Novel:
Throne of the Crescent Moon, Saladin Ahmed (DAW; Gollancz ’13)

Novella:
In the House of Aryaman, a Lonely Signal Burns”, Elizabeth Bear (Asimov’s 1/12)
The Stars Do Not Lie”, Jay Lake (Asimov’s 10-11/12)

Novelette:
Faster Gun”, Elizabeth Bear (Tor.com 8/12)
The Lady Astronaut of Mars”, Mary Robinette Kowal (Rip-Off!)

Short Story:
The Deeps of the Sky”, Elizabeth Bear (Edge of Infinity)

Collection:
Shoggoths in Bloom, Elizabeth Bear (Prime)

Full list of nominations here.

Apr 2
2013

Congratulations to the 2013 Hugo Award nominees!

Over the Easter weekend, the 2013 ballot for the Hugo Awards was announced. The award ceremony will be hosted by LoneStarCon 3.

* Congratulations to Saladin Ahmed for Throne of the Crescent Moon in the novel category!

* Congratulations to Jay Lake for “The Stars Do Not Lie” (Asimov’s, Oct-Nov 2012) in the novella category!

* Congratulations to Mary Robinette Kowal as part of the Writing Excuses team for Writing Excuses Season Seven in the Best Related Work category!

* Congratulations to Jason Heller as part of the editorial team for Clarkesworld in the Best Semiprozine category!

More details here. Congratulations to all the finalists.

Oct 16
2012

Praise for Saladin Ahmed’s Throne of the Crescent Moon

Throne of the Crescent Moon by Saladin Ahmed

Doctor Adoulla Makhslood is certainly an unlikely epic fantasy hero. He’s fat, past his prime, and far less interested in magical adventure than in sipping cardamom tea and dreaming of his unrequited love for an over-the-hill whore turned brothelkeeper. But unheroic though he is, Makhslood is the last of the great ghul hunters—the only honorable magician left in a city full of frauds and charlatans. The tarnished honor of his beloved native city of Dhamsawaat rests in Dr. Makhslood’s hands. And when his mistress asks him to save her orphaned great-nephew, whose parents have just been devoured by bone ghuls, Makhslood is cast into the middle of a diabolical plot on which (naturally!) the fate of the civilized world depends.

Throne of the Crescent Moon appears to be the first book of a forthcoming trilogy—and I couldn’t be happier about that. I only wish that the next two volumes were going to be out in time for sumer vacation this year, because Saladin Ahmed has produced that rarest and finest of literary treasures: beach reading for the thinking fantasy fan. This book delights, amuses, romances, and entertains the reader …without ever insulting his or her intelligence. And on top of that, Ahmed has produced an epic fantasy that feels authentically Islamic, not just in its setting, historical references, and magical systems, but also in the wonderfully drawn character of Doctor Makhslood, a man who sees all the absurdity and charlatanry around him…and yet somehow manages to keep on keeping on with a self-deprecating heroism that reminds me uncannily of more than one Arab human rights activist I’ve known over the years.

Throne of the Crescent Moon is a delight in every imaginable way. The writing is surefooted and confident. The humor is spot-on page after page. The setting is so richly drawn that it practically smells like walking down the streets of Fez or Cairo. The magic draws convincingly on Iraqi and Egyptian folktales, as well as the Thousand and One Nights, Sufi lore, and much much more. And wrapped up in all the swordslinging and spellmongering are a few hard-won grains of wisdom about what it takes to be a hero in a world run by bullies and despots.

–Chris Moriarty, Fantasy and Science Fiction Magazine, September/October 2012

Feb 6
2012

Library Journal Starred Review for Ahmed debut

Throne of the Crescent Moon by Saladin Ahmed

When the niece of a woman once dear to him is murdered by a demon, Doctor Adoulla Makhslood, the last of the true ghul (ghoul) hunters, leaves his precious retirement to track down the killers. Enlisting the help of old adventuring friends—the mage Dawoud and his alchemist wife Litaz, as well as his assistant, the passionately fanatic young dervish Raseed bas Raseed—Adoulla scours the great city of Dhamsawaat for clues to the identity of the infamous Orshado, the ghul of ghuls, who threatens to destroy the world. Also joining the hunt is Zamia, a young tribeswoman gifted with the ability to take the form of a lioness, who seeks revenge for the massacre of her entire tribe.

VERDICT Set in a quasi­ Middle Eastern city and populated with the supernatural creatures of Arab folklore, this long-awaited debut by a finalist for the Nebula and Campbell awards brings The Arabian Nights to sensuous life. The maturity and wisdom of Ahmed’s older protagonists are a delightful contrast to the brave impulsiveness of their younger companions. This trilogy launch will delight fantasy lovers who enjoy flawed but honorable protagonists and a touch of the exotic. –Library Journal, Starred Review

Jan 23
2012

Starred Review from Kirkus for Ahmed debut

Throne of the Crescent Moon by Saladin Ahmed

In Dhamsawaat, chief city of the Cres­cent Moon Kingdoms, Doctor Adoulla Makhslood has devoted his life to hunting and destroying ghuls, constructs brewed from bones, sand and bugs and animated by the vile blood-magic of evil sorcerers. Now fat, old and weary, Adoulla endeavors to ignore the power strug­gle developing between the cruel, despotic, aloof Khalif and the elusive, magic-powered Robin Hood-style thief who calls himself the Falcon Prince. But when the family of his old flame-turned-brothel keeper Miri is slaughtered by ghuls, Adoulla sets aside his teacup, summons his young assistant, Raseed, a deadly but naive warrior dervish steeped in the religion of his sect, and by the will of God steels himself for another battle. Tracking the ghuls into the desert, Adoulla and Raseed come upon a young girl, Zamia, whose entire family have also been slaughtered by the ghuls. Zamia, a shapeshifter who can take the form of a huge golden lioness with silver claws, proves more than adept at killing ghuls, but her femininity and forwardness deeply trouble the pious and traditional Raseed. Equally disturbing to Adoulla is the sheer sor­cerous power necessary to create such terrible ghuls, and indica­tions that the Falcon Prince is somehow involved. Adoulla, while no fan of the vicious Khalif, refuses to endorse a disastrous civil war. As you might expect, the Arabian Nights theme dominates, and in language, style and approach, Ahmed carries it off with only minor slips into American vernacular. Equally impressive are characters who struggle not only against their opponents but against their own misgivings and desires, and accept that victory may be achieved only at great personal cost. An arresting, sumptuous and thoroughly satisfying debut. –Kirkus, Starred Review

Next Entries »