Dec 11
2017

Kirkus on The Prey of Gods

The Prey of Gods by Nicky Drayden

“Nicky Drayden’s debut novel The Prey of Gods is a surprising cornucopia of genres and characters taking place in a futurist South Africa and with seemingly disparate, multi-layered storylines that slowly progress toward each other—just as the characters do. It’s a little bit surreal, a little bit weird, a lot of fun and wholly impressive. ” — Kirkus

Dec 8
2017

The Stone in the Skull is one of B&N SFF’s Best of 2017

The Stone in the Skull by Elizabeth Bear is on the list of Barnes & Noble SFF’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy of 2017. Congratulations again, Bear!

They also chose twelve “alternate universe picks” (effectively runners-up), including The Prey of Gods by Nicky Drayden, Raven Stratagem by Yoon Ha Lee, and All Systems Red by Martha Wells!

Jul 28
2017

Tor.com on The Prey of Gods

The Prey of Gods by Nicky Drayden

“The skill with which Drayden pulls off her fully realized world, bananas plot, and multivocal narrative is so impressive it’s hard to believe this is a debut novel. And on top of her nearly supernatural ability to juggle something like thirty-seven balls at once, she’s also an inventive and delightful stylist with an eye for the novel metaphor and snappy turn of phrase. She can build a fleshed-out character in a handful of paragraphs, make you (well, sometimes) root for a demonic ancient evil who eats people in order to fit into her party dress (it’s complicated), and move you even as you can’t stop laughing. Though she’s pulling from sources as diverse as folkloric origin stories and Terry Pratchett, she balances the disparate elements of her story beautifully….The Prey of Gods is a remarkable debut; I can’t wait to see what Drayden does next.” — Tor.com

Jul 18
2017

New York Times on The Prey of Gods

The Prey of Gods by Nicky Drayden

“A madcap, rapid-fire tale of South Africa in the year 2064, where a handful of individuals are suddenly plagued by godhood. One, Nomvula, is a lonely little township girl born with power. Several others acquire their abilities from godsend, to varying degrees of trauma or delight: Muzi, a gay teenager facing multiple tests of manhood; Stoker, a politician struggling with identity and idealism; and Riya, a diva with a magical voice and a hidden disability. Meanwhile Sydney, a nail technician who was born powerful like Nomvula but is much older and more ruthless, decides it’s time to reclaim her birthright as a bloodthirsty, vengeful demi-goddess. As a genetically engineered virus spreads and threatens to awaken the latent godhood of billions, these few special individuals come together to decide, ultimately, what manner of gods will rule the future. Oh — and also, the technological apocalypse looms as personal robots all over the world quietly become self-aware…Drayden’s delivery of all this is subtly poignant and slap-in-the-face deadpan — perfect for this novel-length thought exercise about what kinds of gods a cynical, self-absorbed postmodern society really deserves. Lots of fun.” — New York Times

Jun 30
2017

Barnes & Noble SFF on The Prey of Gods

The Prey of Gods by Nicky Drayden

“Her style is utterly unique. There’s a freshness in the tone and pace that ensures The Prey of Gods isn’t just going to be one of the best science fiction (or is it fantasy?) novels of the year, but also, hopefully, a launching point to many more raucous, evocative works from its author.

What Drayden has accomplished is important and impressive, particularly for a debut. She has populated a sci-fi universe with fully fleshed personalities spanning disparate walks of life, some more underrepresented than others, and has made each of them into characters complete and compelling—irreverently funny, beautifully and empathetically drawn. There are depths to The Prey of Gods that make it both an endlessly enjoyable read and the start of something truly promising—not another sci-fi trilogy, but a career to follow.” — Barnes & Noble SFF

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